Do you have a strong awareness of your own emotions, needs, and values? Are you independently driven and self-motivated? Intrapersonal intelligence is a very valuable gift that allows us to have a realistic perception of our strengths, weaknesses, and the emotions that underlie all our behaviors. People with strong intrapersonal intelligence are able to make good decisions without getting weighed down by other people’s expectations or peer pressure. They are very aware of the reasons behind their actions and think carefully about what they do.

While interpersonal intelligence helps us to navigate social settings easily, intrapersonal intelligence helps us to move towards situations that will utilize our unique talents and gifts. It helps us to be aware of ethical and moral issues and our own desires and potential.

Each Myers-Briggs® personality type has a unique form of intrapersonal intelligence and a unique understanding of themselves and where they fit into the big picture of humanity. Today’s article is going to give us a closer look at the intrapersonal intelligence of each personality type.

The Intrapersonal Intelligence of Every Myers-Briggs® Personality Type

The ENFP and INFP Personality Types

I’m grouping these two personality types together because they both have the same mental processes, but in a different order.

ENFP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)
Auxiliary: Introverted Feeling (Fi)
Tertiary: Extraverted Thinking (Te)
Inferior: Introverted Sensing (Si)

INFP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Feeling (Fi)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)
Tertiary: Introverted Sensing (Si)
Inferior: Extraverted Thinking (Te)

Both INFPs and ENFPs need to know themselves and their unique purpose in life.  They pay attention to their emotions and try to discern whether there is an underlying reason for them. They focus on personal meaning, potential, and authenticity. While they value the harmony that comes from having interpersonal awareness, intrapersonal awareness is usually an area they focus on more. The healthiest NFPs look inward to determine whether each choice they make lines up with their desires, strengths, and beliefs. They are aware of their identity and are more likely to be individualistic than social chameleons. Personal growth is an important factor in their lives – they believe in fine-tuning their life to fit with their unique abilities. These two types especially value respect for individual autonomy. In a situation where a person is being singled out or pressured to conform, an NFP is likely to stand up to the crowd in defense of the single individual. They are strong believers in each person having the freedom to maintain their unique perspective. They can be very outspoken and defiant if they believe that someone’s values are being trampled or they are being bullied.

It’s important for both ENFPs and INFPs to take the time for quiet and peaceful reflection. During these moments they are able to analyze themselves and figure out the roots of their feelings, goals, and motivations. During these times they can re-assess what’s important to them and whether their lives are following the path that will get them to the goals they want to reach.

Read These Next: Understanding ENFP Intuition, Understanding INFP Feeling

The ENTP and INTP Personality Types

ENTP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)
Auxiliary: Introverted Thinking (Ti)
Tertiary: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)
Inferior: Introverted Sensing (Si)

INTP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Thinking (Ti)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)
Tertiary: Introverted Sensing (Si)
Inferior: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)

ENTPs and INTPs have a very similar layout of mental processes so we’re going to discuss them both at the same time. Both these types value internal accuracy. They have to have an organized inner world and they like to have all their ideas and facts categorized into very precise units or “mental folders”. They believe in solving their own problems, living independently, and questioning norms and traditions to find out what’s really true. Their ability to see things objectively helps them to realize when they (or others) are being biased in their decisions.

People with high intrapersonal intelligence are self-motivated and tend to work independently. Both ENTPs and INTPs tend to pursue career paths that allow them maximum autonomy. Both especially tend to enjoy entrepreneurship where they can be their own boss and work on projects that coincide with their passions and interests. Both ENTPs and INTPs tend to have varied interests and enjoy mixing things up and learning on a constant basis.

The emotional side of intrapersonal intelligence can be harder for ENTPs and INTPs. Both of these types don’t have Introverted Feeling (Fi) in their primary function stack. Fi is the mental process that we use when we analyze our own values, ethics, and subjective preferences. Because Fi isn’t in the NTPs main function stack these types can struggle to be aware of what really matters to them. They can get distracted dabbling in many different projects and struggle to figure out which goals are in line with their unique value system. It can be difficult for them to assess their emotions because they often view this process as a waste of time. Regular journaling can help them to advance this aspect of their intrapersonal intelligence.

Read These Next: 10 Surprising Truths about ENTPs, Understanding INTP Thinking

The INFJ and ENFJ Personality Types

INFJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Intuition (Ni)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)
Tertiary: Introverted Thinking (Ti)
Inferior: Extraverted Sensing (Se)

ENFJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)
Auxiliary: Introverted Intuition (Ni)
Tertiary: Extraverted Sensing (Se)
Inferior: Introverted Thinking (Ti)

INFJs and ENFJs notice intrinsic patterns and connections in time. They can easily shift perspectives to see various points of view virtually simultaneously. They easily see how things will play out and notice the future implications of current decisions and events. Their intuition helps them to read between-the-lines, notice underlying patterns and meanings, and make decisions that align with their long-term goals. Being able to come up with original strategies and insights is an aspect of intrapersonal intelligence that NFJs excel at. INFJs and ENFJs synthesize various symbols, insights, and perspectives into one unique plan for the future.

Because INFJs and ENFJs value Extraverted Feeling (Fe) over Introverted Feeling (Fi) they tend to have a stronger understanding of the emotional interplay between others than the internal emotions and desires of their own. They tend to be social chameleons more than individualists, as INFPs and ENFPs tend to be. This means that NFJs tend to have a stronger interpersonal awareness than intrapersonal awareness. That said, NFJs are good at stepping outside themselves to see what they’re doing in relationship to how it affects other people and the world around them.

Read these next: 10 Ways INFJs Can Boost Their Creativity, 10 Talents of the INFJ and ENFJ Personality Types

The INTJ and ENTJ Personality Types

INTJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Intuition (Ni)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Thinking (Te)
Tertiary: Introverted Feeling (Fi)
Inferior: Extraverted Sensing (Se)

ENTJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Thinking (Te)
Auxiliary: Introverted Intuition (Ni)
Tertiary: Extraverted Sensing (Se)
Inferior: Introverted Feeling (Fi)

INTJs and ENTJs value skills and abilities and the application of those skills in a strategic way. They are known for their will-power and self-control and are good at achieving far-reaching objectives. The ability to strategize, plan, and achieve without worrying about external emotions or distractions is one way they utilize their intrapersonal intelligence. They usually know what they want and they’re good at figuring out a way to get it, even if the roadmap is complex and requires innovation and creative thinking.

Because INTJs and ENTJs are first and foremost thinking types, they can lose sight of the emotional undercurrents that drive their decisions. Emotional intrapersonal intelligence, therefore, can be a struggle for them. Analyzing their feelings, their subjective values, and “getting to know themselves” isn’t normally at the top of their priority list. While they’re skilled at coming up with original plans, they aren’t always analyzing how that plan coincides with their emotional needs or their subjective ethics. The more mature the NTJ is the better they will be at reflecting and analyzing their internal reasons for doing something before they go about doing it. INTJs tend to have a strong moral code that they live by, especially as they reach mid-life. ENTJs tend to become more aware of their subjective values and what matters to them on a personal level as they get older as well. Activities like journaling and reading about philosophy or psychology can help them to get more in touch with how they process things.

Read These Next: 10 Things That Excite the INTJ Personality Type, 10 Things You’ll Relate to if You’re an ENTJ

The ISFP and ESFP Personality Types

ISFP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Feeling (Fi)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Sensing (Se)
Tertiary: Introverted Intuition (Ni)
Inferior: Extraverted Thinking (Te)

ESFP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Sensing (Se)
Auxiliary: Introverted Feeling (Fi)
Tertiary: Extraverted Thinking (Te)
Inferior: Introverted Intuition (Ni)

ISFPs and ESFPs have a strong belief in authenticity, individuality, and understanding the emotional background to each decision they make. ISFPs tend to be more reflective than ESFPs, simply because they value introverted feeling more than extraverted sensing. ISFPs focus on assessing their internal value system and what matters to them before they act outwardly. ESFPs tend to be experiencers first, responding to the environment and looking for opportunities before assessing their internal value system. The more time each personality type takes to reflect on their decisions, their values, and what’s important to them, the stronger their intrapersonal intelligence usually becomes. That said, one of the strengths of SFPs is their ability to be spontaneous and adapt to change without wasting time.

ISFPs and ESFPs believe in knowing themselves and owning their strengths. They want to feel competent and capable in the physical world, able to “roll with the punches” and handle whatever life throws at them. They are individualistic and they often have a relaxed but confident demeanor. They are more concerned with living in accordance with their beliefs and ethics than “going with the flow”. This individuality and resolve exemplifies their unique form of intrapersonal intelligence.

The ISTP and ESTP Personality Types

ISTP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Thinking (Ti)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Sensing (Se)
Tertiary: Introverted Intuition (Ni)
Inferior: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)

ESTP Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Sensing (Se)
Auxiliary: Introverted Thinking (Ti)
Tertiary: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)
Inferior: Introverted Intuition (Ni)

ISTPs and ESTPs are extremely independent, pragmatic individuals. These highly observant types are skilled at figuring out how to solve problems or respond to threats quickly in the real world. They know how to maneuver themselves expertly through crisis situations where logical thinking and an understanding of the mechanics of things is important. They have strong instincts and are highly resourceful. They pride themselves on being confident and not backing down from a challenge. Their intrapersonal intelligence reveals itself in their ability to think independently and critically, solving problems by looking for resources and knowing their physical capabilities and/or limitations.

When it comes to the emotional, introspective side of intrapersonal intelligence, ISTPs and ESTPs can struggle. Both types tend to be more aware of the physical components of things rather than the emotional undercurrents that make up their decisions. They don’t tend to spend a lot of time self-analyzing or dwelling on their own feelings. This can mean that they dabble in a lot of activities or projects but may not stop to reflect on how those projects match up with their subjective desires and ethics. They can be out of touch with their emotions, and during periods of loss or grief they may stifle their feelings completely. This can result in their emotions “bubbling up” at a later date unexpectedly. ISTPs and ESTPs who want to become more in tune with their own values and feelings can work on this by journaling, recording dreams, or meditating quietly.

Read these next: 10 Things You Should Never Say to an ISTP, 10 Things You’ll Relate to if You’re an ESTP

The ISFJ and ESFJ Personality Types

ISFJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Sensing (Si)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)
Tertiary: Introverted Thinking (Ti)
Inferior: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)

ESFJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Feeling (Fe)
Auxiliary: Introverted Sensing (Si)
Tertiary: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)
Inferior: Introverted Thinking (Te)

ISFJs and ESFJs take the time to process their experiences and discern what lessons they learned from them. They are usually good at looking inwards to sort out which decisions led to positive or negative outcomes and then re-assessing their choices in light of that analysis.

SFJs are highly attuned to the routines and practices that create comfort and stability in their lives and the lives of others. SFJs believe in dedication to a routine because they know that they work better when they maintain consistent healthy habits. When these types are mature they prioritize self-care, maintaining internal comfort, getting enough sleep, and eating the right foods. They know they’ll think more clearly and be at their best if they are coming from a physically healthy place. However, sometimes SFJs can struggle because they tend to put the needs of others ahead of their own needs. When this happens they can forget about self-care because they get too wrapped up in serving.

SFJs are skilled at understanding the emotional and practical impact of their decisions. They think hard about their commitments and believe in following through on their word. That’s why they’re likely to jot down dates in their calendar and prioritize agreements they’ve made. They are not wishy-washy or fond of procrastinating. This self-discipline is one of the ways intrapersonal intelligence can manifest in their day-to-day lives.

SFJs tend to have a natural interpersonal intelligence. They are usually highly aware of the needs and desires of other people. Unfortunately this can mean that they lose sight of their own values, desires, and what matters to them. ISFJs and ESFJs can work on this by journaling their thoughts and desires or keeping track of dreams or random insights in a notebook.

Read this next: Self-Care for Every Myers-Briggs® Personality Type

The ISTJ and ESTJ Personality Types

ISTJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Introverted Sensing (Si)
Auxiliary: Extraverted Thinking (Te)
Tertiary: Introverted Feeling (Fi)
Inferior: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)

ESTJ Mental Processes:
Dominant: Extraverted Thinking (Te)
Auxiliary: Introverted Sensing (Si)
Tertiary: Extraverted Intuition (Ne)
Inferior: Introverted Feeling (Fi)

ISTJs and ESTJs have an intrapersonal intelligence that tends to show itself through commitment and a strong work-ethic. These types think carefully about their decisions and they are very concerned with knowing what’s practical and responsible. Once they do move forward on something they are usually dedicated and dependable. The last thing they want to do is go back on their word or appear ineffectual or irresolute. ISTJs and ESTJs like a comfortable, secure life and they know that in order to get this they need to put in the work and dedication to attain that. This usually means that they’ve thought ahead about things like retirement plans, budgets, or even what kind of food to eat to feel their best. ISTJs and ESTJs who are under-developed or immature may not be as aware of these things or may ignore them in favor of satisfying more immediate desires.

ISTJs and ESTJs are good at critically analyzing their decisions, weighing the pros and cons, and ignoring fleeting emotions that might cause bias. However, this same strength can also be a weakness. Because assessing their own emotions tends to feel like a chore to STJs, they can get so wrapped up in checking items off a to-do list that they forget to think about what they really want for themselves in life. Taking regular time to check in with their own needs and to assess their emotions and feelings can be a good way for them to prioritize things that will make them truly happy.

Read these next: 10 Things That Terrify ISTJs, 10 Things You Should Never Say to an ESTJ

What Are Your Thoughts?

Did you enjoy this article or do you have any insights to add? Let us know in the comments!

Take a look at the unique intrapersonal intelligence of each #personality type. #MBTI #INFJ #INTJ #INFP #INTP

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Susan Storm is a certified MBTI® practitioner and lover of all things psychology-related. She is the mom of five beautiful children and loves using her knowledge of personality type to understand them and others better! Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest to learn more about type!

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