Have you ever wondered why certain people get angry about things that don’t bother you at all? Do you ever feel like your own pet peeves are laughed at or misunderstood? According to the enneagram, all of us have unique fears, desires, and struggles that relate to our childhood and messages that we didn’t receive but desperately needed. Today we’re going to take a look at the one thing that can make each enneagram type really lose their temper. Not sure what your enneagram type is? Find out here! Are you new to the enneagram? Find out more about it here.

Here’s What Infuriates You, Based on Your Enneagram Type

Enneagram One – Laziness

Ones are one of the most principled and hard-working of the enneagram personality types. They are often crusaders for good; teaching, advocating, and helping others to be their best selves. They hold themselves to high standards and can have difficulty relaxing because they see so many ways that everything can be improved.  As a result, they struggle to understand people who are lazy or unreliable. People who fail to meet responsibilities, who fritter away their time, or don’t seem to care about improving themselves are highly irritating to Ones. They have such a strong sense of personal obligation and purpose that the mere idea of being unmotivated is baffling to them.

Enneagram Two – Selfishness

Twos believe that a life lived for others is a life best lived. They are the supreme followers of the “Golden Rule” and take selflessness and compassion seriously. In fact, they tend to take their role as a helper so seriously that they can forget their own needs. Twos are typically warm and outgoing, paying special attention to the needs and emotions of the people surrounding them. Because selfishness is so opposed to their primary drive in life, Twos find expressions of selfishness offensive. People who take advantage of others, antagonize people, or are otherwise inconsiderate can make Twos surprisingly enraged. While they tend to dislike conflict, Twos will find it difficult to stay calm around self-serving individuals.

Enneagram Three – Lethargy

Threes are the “Achievers” of the enneagram system. These individuals strive to step outside of ordinary life and accomplish extraordinary things. They are go-getters and can be workaholics if they aren’t balanced. Because of their desire for accomplishment they find lethargy in themselves and others extremely frustrating. When they get hit with a random burst of listlessness it feels like torture because they know they should be achieving something more. When they are surrounded by people who lack ambition or drive it can make them irritable and turned-off.

Enneagram Four – Shallowness

Fours crave depth, honesty, and meaning. One of their main goals in life is to know themselves clearly, seeing their faults and weaknesses for what they are and owning up to their strengths as well. They often feel different from others, and sometimes this is related to their drive towards introspection and depth. Superficial matters rarely concern them and having to focus on such things feels like a slow, agonizing death. They crave a sense of almost shocking authenticity in their relationships, and they are far more interested in matters of the heart than matters of the weather.

Enneagram Five – Intrusiveness

Fives crave alone time and solitude so that they can pursue knowledge and information. They tend to feel drained by people and can lose their sense of self when they are inundated by others. Fives feel like in order to know themselves and regain energy they must get alone and delve inwards towards ideas and theories that spark their fascination. Fives often care deeply for others and often have strong hidden feelings, but they are apt not to share them readily. People who constantly impose on them, interrupt their thoughts, or cling to them emotionally or socially will exasperate them.

Enneagram Six – Unreliableness

Sixes seek security and support in what seems like a chaotic, uncertain world. Hard-working and loyal, they take their commitments seriously and believe that breaking their word or being unreliable is a heinous sin. People who are wishy-washy, dishonest, or unpredictable go against the core values of the Six. For a type that craves certainty, being unable to trust someone or count on them is completely exasperating.

Enneagram Seven – Boredom

Sevens are the happiest when they are productive, active, and busy. These types are intensely curious and pursue new experiences and adventures on a near-constant basis. However, what Sevens detest dealing with is boredom or repetition. Having to focus on one thing for an extended period of time without exploring alternate ideas or opportunities can make them irritable and tense. They seek freedom and variety; their fast-paced mental energy driving them to explore new sights, sounds, thrills, and opportunities at every turn. Even though boredom can be absolutely maddening to a Seven, it’s important for them to experience it here and there so that they can finish tasks they begin or tap into their inner wisdom rather than jumping from activity to activity.

Enneagram Eight – Constraints

Eights are extremely independent and strong-willed individuals. They are constantly setting up challenges for themselves so that they can be sure of their capability and competence. These types have enormous willpower and energy – they want to change their environment, make things happen, and pursue their individual goals. More than anything, Eights detest being controlled by other people. When others try to micro-manage or limit them they will have to face the intense wrath of this type. Eights are the quintessential “rugged individualists” and when they feel constrained too forcefully they will do whatever they can to seek freedom and stand alone.

Enneagram Nine – Powerlessness

Nines are the enneagram type most likely to suppress their anger. They avoid facing it because they fear that it could destroy the life they’ve built for themselves. When they are in an unhealthy state they can feel perpetually forced to do things they don’t want to do simply because they struggle to say “No” or stand up for their own desires. The anger of Nines is often simmering under the surface rather than out in the open. They try to hold it down and avoid it for as long as possible, but eventually it may lead to an outburst that surprises everyone around them. While they may not show an immediate reaction to being controlled, these types hate feeling that their voice has been taken away from them. They detest not having the space to live their lives as they see fit. Being out of control or without authority over their own lives is maddening to them, even though it might not be obvious to others. As Nines grow and develop it’s important for them to express their anger rather than smother it. Anger gives them the ability to say no – something that is typically very difficult for them. It allows them to be authentic with people and find solutions rather than ignore offenses or struggles.

What Are Your Thoughts?

Is this article accurate for you? Do you have any insights or experiences to share? Let us know in the comments!

Find out what makes each #enneagram type REALLY angry. #enneatype #Personality #typology

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Susan Storm is a certified MBTI® practitioner and lover of all things psychology-related. She is the mom of five beautiful children and loves using her knowledge of personality type to understand them and others better! Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest to learn more about type!