As an MBTI® practitioner I’ve heard a lot of misconceptions about intelligence and type. Some people assume that intuitives are smarter than sensors or vice versa. Many people think thinking types are naturally smarter than feeling types as well. All of these ideas are inaccurate – the truth is there is no particular type that is inherently smarter than another. Each type has their own unique brand of intelligence.

Over the last few days I’ve been working through a series about personality type and intelligence. On Monday we discussed the NP personality types, Tuesday we discussed the SP personality types, and yesterday we explored the NJ personality types. Today I’m very excited to move onto our final group: The Sensing-Judging (SJ) personality types. Let’s get started!

The Unique Intelligence of the ISTJ, ISFJ, ESTJ, and ESFJ Personality Types

The first thing we need to know about all SJ personality types is that they use a mental process called Introverted Sensing, or “Si” for short. ISTJs and ISFJs have dominant introverted sensing, ESTJs and ESFJs have auxiliary introverted sensing, INTPs and INFPs have tertiary introverted sensing, and ENFPs and ENTPs have inferior introverted sensing.

What Is Introverted Sensing?

Introverted sensing is an information-gathering process that focuses on the internal world of subjective experience and memories. SJ types compare and contrast what they are experiencing now with what they experienced before. This gives them a unique ability to spot changes, patterns, inconsistencies, and workable solutions. Because of this they trust tried-and-true methods and are good at recalling past experiences that offer wisdom for present or future situations. Introverted sensing types also have strong inner-body awareness and enjoy creating a sense of inner comfort.

MY LATEST VIDEOS

How Does Introverted Sensing Impact the SJ Learning Style?

Introverted sensing personality types learn best through familiarity, repetition, and experience. When they learn something new they like to use it right away or repeat the process in order to make sure they have it right. They are very methodical and focused and put a great deal of commitment into everything they do. They enjoy collecting facts and histories, knowing where an idea has come from and whether or not it has been proven and stood the tests of time. They have a skill with logistical intelligence. This means they are good at knowing which resources are necessary to complete a task efficiently and correctly the first time around. They are good at managing resources and creating contingency plans, getting the information to the right place at the right time. They figure if they are going to do something in the future they should take all necessary precautions to ensure they only have to do it once. They have an accurate memory for important details and a knack for learning practical, applied skills.

Other Features of the Introverted Sensing learning Style – I’m breaking this down into groups because ISJs will need a slightly different experience than ESJs:

ISTJs and ISFJs:

  • Prefer to work in small, quiet groups
  • Like things to be quiet
  • Like knowing how much time they have
  • Dislike interruptions
  • Observe before attempting
  • Feel more comfortable when they can practice and repeat what they learn
  • Are usually good at memorization
  • Trust proven facts and what has stood the tests of time
  • Like working in a hands-on way with projects and activities
  • Like having a routine and structure
  • Are detail-oriented
  • Prefer a sequential set of instructions
  • Notice inconsistencies and patterns
  • Like what they learn to have a practical, immediate purpose

ESTJs and ESFJs:

  • Learn well in groups
  • Enjoy collaboration
  • Like to lead, participate, and offer opinions
  • Want to jump right into new experiences with only a brief observational period
  • Are detail-oriented
  • Want a sequential set of instructions
  • Are usually good at memorization
  • Trust proven facts and experience
  • Notice inconsistencies and patterns
  • Like what they learn to have an immediate, practical purpose
  • Dislike interruptions
  • Enjoy real-world examples and demonstrations

SJ personality types are good at breaking a problem down to its components and organizing the order in which things should be done. They believe in improving the present and preserving beneficial lessons from days gone by. They are skilled at providing stability, consistency, and easy-to-follow timelines. They are usually described as “grounded” or “down-to-earth”

ISTJ and ESTJ Learning

These two types have strong organizational skills and think in terms of steps, roles, and rules to follow to meet attainable goals. They tend to use figures, numbers, charts and lists to arrange tasks in a sequential manner. In fact, checking an item off of a to-do list gives them a sense of satisfaction. Maintaining a steady sense of logic and fairness is extremely important to them and they are careful not to let their emotions cloud their judgment unless they are stressed.  STJs like to use hindsight to see if a problem or situation can be improved upon by applying past lessons.

When it comes to learning, these two types do best when there’s a structure and routine in their lives. They want lessons to apply to their lives or their work and have an immediate practical application. Abstract matters and theory can be interesting, but they want it to have a realistic impact in the immediate or foreseeable future.  Memorization, drill, and practice helps STJs to feel capable and secure in what they know. They also look for teachers who have experience and credentials in what they are teaching. Focus and attention to detail are hallmarks of their work.

Overall, STJs have a skill for recalling facts and past experience and applying it in a practical way. They are good at taking note of resources and preparing effectively so that goals are met in a timely manner. They are also good at organizing, segmenting, sorting, and applying logic to situations and criteria. They seem to inherently know how a situation can be organized, how to create a step-by-step procedure, and what the logic is behind things.

ISFJ and ESFJ Learning

SFJ personality types are conscientious, practical, and thorough individuals. They tend to have good communication skills and are gifted at organizing their environment for maximum harmony. They learn best when they have a consistent structure, routine, and plan. Asking questions and putting concepts into hands-on practice helps them to absorb information and understand it thoroughly. These are the types who want to repeat what they’ve learned until they feel proficient at it, as if they can do it “without thinking”. Like all SJ types, SFJs like learning in a step-by-step sequential format. They are usually good at memorizing and don’t mind practicing and putting  time in to make sure they’ve got it right. They are often meticulous, careful, and detail-oriented.

Like all feeling types, SFJs learn best when their teachers believe in them and affirm their efforts. Having immediate reassurance and feedback helps them to stay confident and know they are on the right track.

Overall, SFJs have a skill for recalling facts and past experiences. They can remember relevant detailed information and apply it to the current situation with ease and elegance. They are also skilled at picking up on the emotions and feelings of the people around them. They innately seem to know what people need and when. They have a gift for diplomacy, peacemaking, and hosting.

How Well do ISFJs, ISTJs, ESFJs, and ESTJs Perform in School?

Sensing-judging types tend to get above-average grades in school. Their methodical, organized approach means that they tend to hand their work in on time. Because they usually respect the rules and guidelines given by their teachers, they tend to perform their homework and class projects meticulously.  Their patience for practice and memorization means that they are often able to perform well in tests that call on memory.

A Breakdown of the Intelligence Style of Each SJ Personality Type:

ISFJs:

  • Reflective
  • Observational
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Participant
  • Like lecture format
  • Concrete
  • Experiential
  • Adaptively creative
  • Connected
  • Sequential
  • Collaborative
  • Structured
  • Sequential
  • Goal-Oriented
  • High in fact-retention, methodical study, serialist learning
  • Naturalist
  • Inter-personal

ISTJs:

  • Reflective
  • Observational
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Like lecture format
  • Concrete
  • Experiential
  • Adaptively Creative
  • Sequential
  • Structured
  • Goal-Oriented
  • High in fact-retention
  • Methodical
  • Systematic decision-maker
  • Serialist learner
  • Naturalist
  • Logical

ESFJs:

  • Concrete
  • Active
  • Experimental
  • Collaborative
  • Like projects, simulations, and peer teaching
  • External decision-maker
  • Goal-oriented
  • Connected
  • Sequential
  • Methodical
  • High in fact retention
  • Adaptively creative
  • Field dependent
  • Structured
  • Inter-personal
  • Naturalist

ESTJs:

  • Concrete
  • Active
  • Experiential
  • Collaborative
  • Logical
  • Like projects, simulations, and peer teaching
  • Naturalist
  • Goal-oriented
  • Sequential
  • Methodical
  • High in fact-retention
  • Field dependent
  • Adaptively creative
  • Structured
  • Systematic decision-maker
  • Participant

What are Your Thoughts?

Did you enjoy this article? Do you have any thoughts or experiences to add? Let us know in the comments!

Other Articles to Check Out:

Here’s What You Hated About School, Based On Your Personality Type

Here’s Who Drives You Crazy, Based On Your Personality Type

How You Can Be a Powerful Entrepreneur, Based On Your Personality Type

What Each Myers-Briggs® Personality Type REALLY Wants to Talk About

Discover the unique intelligence of the #ISTJ, #ISFJ, #ESTJ and #ESFJ #personality types! #MBTI #Personalitytype #Myersbriggs

The following two tabs change content below.
Susan Storm is a certified MBTI® practitioner and lover of all things psychology-related. She is the mom of five beautiful children and loves using her knowledge of personality type to understand them and others better! Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest to learn more about type!

MBTI, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Myers-Briggs are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Myers and Briggs Foundation, Inc., in the United States and other countries.

%d bloggers like this: